FOLLOW THE DAUGHTERS OF LOGGY, GREEN AND LEATHER...
Our Adopted Turtles

Follow Loggy, Greeny and Leather's daughters as they journey the ocean
We've adopted three sea turtles to support their cause, but also to help our readers and website vistors gain an opportunity to learn about these amazing animals. Even if you don't live near the ocean, you can still follow their migration and study their habits. We hope that you'll enjoy getting to know our three girls, Naya, Squirt and Chica.

CHICA
Green Sea Turtle
Green Sea Turtle

I'm the daughter of Ms. Greeny from Mara's books and I'm an adult female green sea turtle. Conservationists found me nesting on July 20, 2009, on the beach in the Tortuguero National Park, Costa Rica. I'm a big girl and measure 107.5 cm (or just about 3.5 feet!) in curved carapace (shell) length.

Turtle map courtesy of the Caribbean Conservation Center. To support Chica, please visit their site.

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SQUIRTGreen Sea Turtle
Loggerhead Sea Turtle
I'm an adult female loggerhead sea turtle and the sassy daughter of Ms. Loggy from Mara's books. Conservationists found me nesting on July 31, 2009, just south of the Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge, in Florida. What a beautiful area! I measure 90.5 cm (or just about 3 feet!) in curved carapace (shell) length. Check out where I 've been swiming lately using the links below and consider adopting me to support me and my future loggerhead babies.

Turtle map courtesy of the Caribbean Conservation Center. To support Dory, please visit their site.

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NAYAGreen Sea Turtle
Leatherback Sea Turtle

I'm an adult female leatherback sea turtle and the daughter of famous Ms. Leather from Mara's books. Conservationists found me nesting on June 1, 2009, on Chiriquí Beach in Panama. I measure 152.5 cm (or just over 5 feet!) in curved carapace (shell) length, that makes me the biggest here! Check out my links below to see where I've been swiming lately and to help support me and my babies.

Turtle map courtesy of the Caribbean Conservation Center. To support Naya, please visit their site.


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Ever tried to eat a jellyfish?
Oh! Of course not, you're a human! Jellyfish aren't good for people. But, if you were a turtle like me, they'd be so yummy! Jellyfish have stingers they use to protect themselves. Lucky me, I have thick skin and so it doesn't hurt me one bit. Catching up to and getting a good bite though is very tricky! Watch how I do it, press the play button above.

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Bath Time!
I can tell you from experience that there is nothing better than a day at the turtle spa. I lay down for a rest and all these little fishes come up and clean off my shell. This is good for me because I can't reach back there myself and great for the fishes as they get a yummy snack! Do you know what this type of relationship is called? Mutualism! Meaning both animals benefit!

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Time to make the turtles!
This shows me and another sea turtle mating. This is how baby sea turtles are made! After we mate, I will swim a long distance to lay my eggs on a sandy beach where my baby sea turtles will hatch!

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Straight from my baby book...
Human babies have it SO easy! When I hatched I had to dig out of the sand and run run run for the water! That means I already had to know how to swim! You can watch as I scurry to the water by pressing the play button above.

 

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